A book review of “Elementals: Ice Wolves”

This book review is by one of our local young people:

Review for Elementals: Ice Wolves by Amie Kaufman

If I could pick one word to describe this book, it would be astounding! I was launched
into a world of fast-paced action and magic from the first page, and I found myself devouring every word of it. This is a very well-written work, with artful prose and a beautifully painted culture and society full of magical shapeshifters.

The main character – Anders – struggles with self-esteem issues, which I imagine many
people can find relatable in today’s world. There is a smattering of violence, but it is not
described graphically – unlike other books, such as Warriors by Erin Hunter or Wings of Fire by Tui T. Sutherland – which makes it appropriate for the younger readers who are looking for some action. The fighting is just that – fighting. There are no heads getting ripped off or people being burned alive or bones getting smashed, and I found this surprisingly refreshing. The story also has some educational and inspirational purposes, as it teaches readers how to believe in themselves, as well as trust their friends to protect and stand by them during tough times. Also included are morals surrounding being supportive of your siblings, which is a valuable lesson to teach young readers. As to education, throughout the story there are subtle explanations of wolf behavior, such as nonverbal signaling, which I found to be accurate in all respects.

Overall this was a wonderful read, and I am eagerly awaiting the next installment in the
series. In fact, the only problem I had with the story is this – it was too short! I highly
recommend it to anyone who has an abiding love for fantasy and animals.

– J. Browning

Book Review of “A Possibility of Whales”

This is a review of the new book A Possibility of Whales  by S. D., a 6th grader:

(This review contains possible spoilers for the story.)

In the book A Possibility of Whales by Karen Rivers, there is a girl named Natalia.  She lives with her dad and doesn’t know who her mom is.  Natalia moves to a lot of different places because her dad is a famous movie star named Xan Gallagher.  She lives in San Francisco and makes a new friend named Solly (pronounced “sol-yay”).  Then she moves to Canada and makes a new friend named Harry.  His parents thought he would be a girl and they named him Harriet–Harry for short.

To celebrate Natalia’s 13th birthday, her dad takes her to Mexico and invites Harry and his parents.  Since Natalia loved whales so much, her dad let her go on a boat with Harry to see some whales, but the boat breaks and the whale saves them from drowning.

I recommend that 12 year-olds or higher read this book.